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Because Hamiltonians Reach Back: Torrence Moore ’92


Torrence Moore ’92
Torrence Moore ’92

Torrence Moore ’92 is approaching his 30th year on the board of LINK Scholars Unlimited, a Chicago nonprofit that helps promising Black high school students gain access to college. Moore was once one of those students, and through LINK he met the man who would become his mentor and introduce him to Hamilton — Art Massolo ’64.

Moore is a LINK mentor now, so far supporting seven students in their journey to college. He’s never found it burdensome to make time for that work, even as he balances it with family and career. “A lot of times I see myself in the students, having sat in their seat and been where they are, so for me, it’s easy knowing that you are making a difference in this student’s life or at least helping give them exposure and access to things they may not have normally had,” Moore says.

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His career, too, reflects a commitment to giving back. After earning a master’s degree in urban planning and policy, he went into finance and community development. He has worked at several financial institutions where he has focused on increasing access to capital and credit to underinvested and underbanked communities. He’s also founder of and partner in TMA Consulting, which works with nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and small businesses on financing, technical assistance, and program administration.

Moore has served as a Hamilton alumni trustee, was founding chair and still serves on the Multicultural Alumni Relations Committee, and is a member of the Days-Massolo Center’s 10th Anniversary Steering Committee. The center is named for his mentor, a Hamilton life trustee and emeritus member of the LINK board. Over the decades, first Massolo and then Moore introduced scores of LINK Scholars to the College. Moore estimates that roughly 30 of them matriculated, but points out that there haven’t been any in the last few years. He’d like to change that.

“I would love to see that connection happen again and keep that relationship going,” he says.

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