05BF5C3D-FE25-CDD2-D0B43F36A4F6028E
5FE5DC56-B2B0-82CA-538B28016054EA90
Public Events
Public Events Calendar >>

DIRECTIONS AND COLLEGE MAP

Media Relations
315-859-4680
Cleaning seeds from cotton, Raipur, Ahmedabad, 1937 - Courtesy of the artist
Cleaning seeds from cotton, Raipur, Ahmedabad, 1937 - Courtesy of the artist
PHOTO: PRANLAL K. PATEL

ARTnews Proclaims Wellin Museum Show "A Must See"

By Vige Barrie  |  Contact Lisa Trivedi (315) 859-4681
Posted January 24, 2014
Tags Art History Exhibitions Fine Arts Hamilton In the News History History of India (1850-1950) Lisa Trivedi Museum Robert Knight

"Refocusing the Lens: Pranlal K. Patel’s Photographs of Women at Work in Ahmedabad" hasn’t yet opened at the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art. But that hasn’t kept ARTnews from noticing and celebrating the upcoming exhibition on its website and in print. The publication’s  Jan. 23 article, “10 Must-See Museum Photo Shows of Spring 2014,” includes the Wellin exhibition along with shows at the Morgan Library & Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, Yale University Art Gallery, the High Museum of Art, the Philadelphia  Museum  of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Nelson–Atkins Museum in Kansas City, Missouri.

Indian photographer Pranlal K. Patel (b. 1910-2014), an active photographer for  70 years, was approached in 1937 by a women’s social reform organization in India to photograph women engaged in a variety of economic activities that supported the growing city’s life. "Refocusing the Lens" provides unprecedented insight, via the images he captured, into the lives of working-class women as they performed a range of labor activities inside their homes as well as within the city’s neighborhoods and its major markets.

The ARTnews article describes the exhibition as providing “an intimate and respectful look at a complex and usually hidden economic and social world.” According to the publication’s website, ARTnews is “the oldest and most widely circulated art magazine in the world with a readership of 180,000 collectors, dealers, historians, artists, museum directors, curators, connoisseurs, and enthusiasts.”

 

Comments

No comments yet.

Cupola