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Events


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F.I.L.M. Series: William Greaves

F.I.L.M. Series: William Greaves
Kirner-Johnson (KJ) 125 Bradford Auditorium, Map #14

William Greaves Event 2:  Scott MacDonald presents William Greaves’ Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (shot in 1968, first version, 1971).

 By 1968, William Greaves had established himself as a significant contributor to modern documentary filmmaking, as well as an accomplished actor and teacher of actors (at the Actors Studio in New York). When a friend asked Greaves if he had a pet project in mind that might seem so unusual to producers that funding would be unlikely, Greaves admitted he had such a project—and the friend became the film’s angel. Symbio is Greaves’ exploration of the filmmaking process itself, including the complex relationships of director, actors, crew and—since the film was shot openly in Central Park—bystanders and passers-by.

When Symbio was finally made available to the public, some twenty years later after it was finished (you’ll hear the story at the screening), it was immediately recognized as one of the quintessential Sixties films and a canonical film about filmmaking. Indeed, when Stephen Soderbergh and Steve Buscemi saw the film, they agreed to assist in the production of a follow-up, which became Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take 2 ½.

To find KJ125 (Bradford Auditorium) when coming from off-campus up College Hill Road,  follow the F.I.L.M. signs past the crosswalk, then turn left.

Parking is available on the right, just past the Kennedy Center for Studio Arts.

 Thanks to the Office of the Dean of the Faculty and to Audio-Visual Services, and—for their support of our William Greaves events—the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences FilmWatch Program and the Dietrich Inchworm Fund.

 

Contact Information


Scott Macdonald
ART HISTORY
smacdona@hamilton.edu 20211024 14:00:00 20211024 17:00:00 America/New_York F.I.L.M. Series: William Greaves <p>William Greaves Event 2:  Scott MacDonald presents William Greaves’ Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (shot in 1968, first version, 1971).</p> <p> By 1968, William Greaves had established himself as a significant contributor to modern documentary filmmaking, as well as an accomplished actor and teacher of actors (at the Actors Studio in New York). When a friend asked Greaves if he had a pet project in mind that might seem so unusual to producers that funding would be unlikely, Greaves admitted he had such a project—and the friend became the film’s angel. Symbio is Greaves’ exploration of the filmmaking process itself, including the complex relationships of director, actors, crew and—since the film was shot openly in Central Park—bystanders and passers-by.</p> <p>When Symbio was finally made available to the public, some twenty years later after it was finished (you’ll hear the story at the screening), it was immediately recognized as one of the quintessential Sixties films and a canonical film about filmmaking. Indeed, when Stephen Soderbergh and Steve Buscemi saw the film, they agreed to assist in the production of a follow-up, which became Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take 2 ½.</p> <p>To find KJ125 (Bradford Auditorium) when coming from off-campus up College Hill Road,  follow the F.I.L.M. signs past the crosswalk, then turn left.</p> <p>Parking is available on the right, just past the Kennedy Center for Studio Arts.</p> <p> Thanks to the Office of the Dean of the Faculty and to Audio-Visual Services, and—for their support of our William Greaves events—the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences FilmWatch Program and the Dietrich Inchworm Fund.</p> <p> </p> Kirner-Johnson (KJ) 125 Bradford Auditorium, Map #14 Scott Macdonald smacdona@hamilton.edu
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