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Psychology

A concentration in psychology consists of nine courses: 101; 201; any of 204, 205, or 232; one laboratory course numbered between 310 and 330; 380; and four additional courses at the 300 level or above, including the Senior Project. Concentrators who place out of Introductory Psychology with a 4 or 5 on the Psychology AP exam must still take a total of nine courses. Students should plan to complete their lab requirement by the end of their junior year. Departmental honors in psychology recognize the distinguished achievement of students who excel in their coursework in the concentration. The Senior Project involves an extensive research and theoretical inquiry, culminating in a written thesis and an oral presentation. The project can be completed in one or two semesters; therefore, concentrators must enroll in 500 and/or 501 during their senior year.

A minor in general psychology consists of five courses: 101; 201; any of 204, 205, or 232; one laboratory course numbered between 310 and 330; and one other course.

The departments of Biology and Psychology offer an interdisciplinary concentration in neuroscience. See the description under Neuroscience.

101F,S Introductory Psychology.
An introduction to the science of human behavior. Topics include the nervous system, perception, learning, motivation, cognitive and social development, personality, individual differences, social behavior and psychopathology. In class laboratory exercises to emphasize the use of research methods and data to describe and examine behavior. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) The Department.

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198F,S Collaborative Research in Psychology.
Students will work on a project with an instructor. Focus on laboratory data collection and analysis. Readings to illustrate hypotheses investigated in the laboratory. Prerequisite, Permission of the instructor. Four-five hours per week of lab work. Does not count toward concentration requirements. Based on evaluation of Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. One quarter credit. Course may be repeated for credit. (Same as Neuroscience 198.) The Department.

201F,S Statistics and Research Methods in Psychology.
The application and interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics in the study of psychological processes. Some instruction in research design and methodological issues. Students will learn to use the statistical computer program SPSS to analyze data. Topics include the principles of hypothesis testing, t tests, analysis of variance, regression, and some non-parametric statistics. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, 101. Not open to students who have taken 280. (Same as Neuroscience 201.) McKee (Fall); Frederick (Spring).

204F,S Human Neuropsychology.
Study of human brain function from the standpoint of experimental and clinical research in behavioral and cognitive neuroscience. Survey of research involving animals and humans, addressing presumed neural mechanisms for cognitive, motivational and emotional states. Analysis of aphasia, agnosias, apraxias and disconnection syndromes. Prerequisite, 101. Not open to students who have completed Psych/Neuro 232. (Same as Neuroscience 204.) Thiruchselvam (F), List (S).

205F,S Introduction to Brain and Behavior.
Study of the structure and function of the nervous system as it relates to consciousness and behavior. Emphasis on psychobiological explanations of perception, learning, attention, motivation, emotion and behavior disorders. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, 101 or Biology 102 or 115. (Same as Neuroscience 205.) Weldon (F), TBD (S).

[298] The Programming Language Matlab.
Development of expertise in the programming language Matlab. Emphasis on learning techniques and solving problems in the sciences and social sciences that are naturally suited to Matlab, such as the manipulation, transformation and display of large data sets, interactive graphics, computational modeling and user-interface design. Prerequisite, two courses in psychology or permission of instructor. Evaluated Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. One-quarter course credit. May not be counted toward the concentration. Maximum enrollment, 10.

310S Attention and Performance.
The selection and transformation of information from sensation and memory as they affect perception, learning, cognition and motor performance. Laboratory exercises and experiments selected from these and related areas. (Writing-intensive.) (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. Maximum enrollment, 20. Vaughan.

[311] The Self in Social Psychology.
Theoretical and methodological understanding of the study of the self in social psychology. Topics include organization of self-concept and its effect on information processing; self-awareness; self-esteem maintenance processes; cultural influences; stigmas; and self-regulation. Class time devoted to discussion of research articles. Laboratory component involves conducting two research projects. Data collection, statistical analysis, papers based on findings, oral and poster presentations. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Writing-intensive.) (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 337 or 361. Maximum enrollment, 20.

314F Individual Differences.
Analysis of complex psychological processes (e.g., the structure of personality, associations between the quality of family relationships and stability and change in personality across time) using data from several ongoing research programs in the Psychology Department, including the Hamilton Longitudinal Study of Families. Emphasis on commonly encountered problems and methods for addressing them using a variety of statistical analyses. Use of statistical computer programs to analyze data. Six hours of class and laboratory. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 305. Maximum enrollment, 20. Pierce.

[315] Cognitive Psychology.
Theoretical and methodological aspects of basic mental processes in attention, perception, memory, language and problem-solving. Emphasis on development of original empirical projects. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[318] Evolutionary Psychology Laboratory.
Explores the theoretical foundations of evolutionary psychology, the empirical support for its theories, the criticisms and competing explanations, and the accurate and inaccurate representations of evolutionary psychology in the lay press. Class time will be devoted to discussion of research articles. Laboratory component involves conducting two research projects. Data collection, statistical analysis, papers based on findings, oral and poster presentations. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[322] Autobiographical Memory.
Methodological and theoretical examination of autobiographical memory. Students will study the relationships among cognitive, social, and developmental factors, such as the influence of early experiences and memory development in early childhood, or the role of gender and older age on memory for specific events. Laboratory component will include developing methods for collecting data, analyzing event narratives, and designing and writing original empirical studies. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Writing-intensive.) (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[325] Applied Developmental Psychology.
Focuses on how basic developmental science can be applied to the "real world" to further the well-being of children, youth and families. Topics will include distinctions between basic and applied research methods, obesity, childcare, schools, adolescents being tried as adults in court and the influence of media (including TV, videogames and computers) on development. Laboratory component will include several projects conducted in an applied setting. Three hours of class and three hours of lab. (Writing-intensive.) (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 365. Maximum enrollment, 20.

326S The Development of Multicultural Youth.
An examination of theoretical and empirical advances in the understanding of the development of multicultural youth, with focus on the development of immigrants, mixed race individuals, and ethnic and sexual minorities. Topics include discrimination, privilege, culture, psychopathology, and relationships. Class time will be devoted to the discussion of research articles. Projects will include analysis of longitudinal data, community outreach, and a research proposal. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Maximum enrollment, 20. José Causadias.

327S Affective Neuroscience.
An exploration of theoretical and methodological questions in the study of affect, addressed through neuroscience. Questions covered will include: What is affect? What functions does affect serve and how does affect become dysfunctional in psychopathology? How does affect shape cognition? How do individuals regulate affect? Class time will be devoted to discussion of research articles. Laboratory exercises will include the development of original experiments to elicit and measure affect, as well as the analysis of neural data. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Writing-intensive.) (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. (Same as Neuroscience 327.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Ravi Thiruchselvam.

328F Cognitive Neuroscience.
Study of brain processes involved in cognition with a focus on current research designs and techniques. Class discussions will focus on journal articles reporting studies on sensory, motor, affective, executive and memory systems. Laboratory exercises will include analysis of data from brain scan, electroencephalographic and neuronal recording studies. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. (Same as Neuroscience 370 and Neuroscience 328.) Maximum enrollment, 20. List.

330S Neural Plasticity.
An analysis of the anatomical, physiological and chemical changes that occur in the nervous system as a function of experience and development. Laboratory work includes intracellular and extracellular recording from muscle cells and neurons. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, 205 or Biology 102 or 115. (Same as Neuroscience 330 and Biology 330.) Maximum enrollment, 18. Weldon.

334S Psychology, Children, Media, and Technology.
How media and emerging technology influence basic psychological processes and child development. Focus on recent literature highlighting social media, video games, the Internet, educational technology, cell phones, advertisements, and other innovations. Topics include identity, body image, sexualization, aggression, addiction, cyberbullying, relationships, learning, health, and the mind. Emphasis on developmental psychology, but articles drawn from all areas. Class time will be devoted to discussion of research articles and chapters, current trends, and critical analysis of this new field. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. (Same as Communication 334.) Sage.

[340] Practical Aspects of Learning and Cognition.
Basic principles that govern the interaction of animals and humans with the environment, with emphasis on applied topics. These include Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning, schedules of reinforcement, and applications with children with special needs. Recommended for students who may be considering clinical applications that use applied behavior analysis, such as Hamilton's Cooperative Educational Program with the New England Center for Children. Emphasis on research methods. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Three hours of class and two hours of laboratory for the first half of the course. Maximum enrollment, 12.

[343] Evolution and Human Behavior.
Examines the evolutionary history of humans and the extent to which it affects current behavior. In addition to surveying the field of evolutionary psychology, this course explores the history of Homo sapiens by drawing from findings in anthropology. Topics include the mechanisms of evolution, archaeological and fossil evidence, primate behavior, human mating behavior, altruism and evolutionary medicine. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 236. (Same as Anthropology 343.)

[344] Cognition and Consciousness.
Examination of basic cognitive processes such as perception, memory, attention, language, and decision-making, and application of these processes to the study of consciousness. Text and article readings include attempts to understand consciousness and its evolution. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201.

[346] Psychology of Reading and Language.
Research-focused on topics in the study of reading and language with an emphasis on the role of memory in perception and comprehension and in language production at the word, sentence and discourse levels. Requires interpretation of original journal articles and participation in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 290.

351S Child Development.
An introduction to the science of child behavior and the principles of child growth and development from conception to early adulthood. Focuses on integrating the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains of development. Includes an experiential component whereby students will work with children or adolescents in an applied setting (e.g., child care center or school). (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Sage.

[352] Psychopharmacology.
A study of the effects of drugs on animal and human behavior. Topics include neuropharmacology, antipsychotics, analgesics, stimulants, hallucinogens, antidepressants, alcoholism, addiction and the implications of drug effects for neurochemical theories of behavior. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 242. (Same as Neuroscience 352.)

353S Adult Psychopathology.
Introduction to the study of mental disorders in adults, including historical and cultural perspectives. Focus on classification, diagnostic assessment, etiology, treatment and evaluation of treatment efficacy for the major disorders including affective, thought, substance and eating disorders. Research methods in clinical psychology emphasized. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 223. McKee.

354S Counseling Psychology.
An overview of the theoretical orientations, treatment approaches and empirical literature in the field of counseling psychology. Examines the mechanisms by which counseling interventions facilitate personal and interpersonal functioning with a focus on emotional, social, educational, vocational and developmental concerns. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 234. Walden.

[355] Sensation and Perception.
An introduction to the human sensory and perceptual apparatus. Includes a consideration of anatomy, neurophysiological mechanisms and the psychological experiences associated with these processes. Covers visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile and proprioceptive senses. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 225.

356F Social Psychology.
A survey of social psychology, the study of how and why people behave, think, and feel in social situations. Topics include social cognition, stereotyping and prejudice, the self, social influence, attitudes and persuasion, attraction and relationships, aggression, and helping behavior. Emphasis on experimental research methodology. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Does NOT overlap substantially with Psych 311W. Borton.

357F Human Memory.
An examination of theoretical and empirical research on the creation and structure of memories. Consideration of both theoretical and applied topics within the memory literature, including autobiographical memories, unconscious memories, factors contributing to forgetting, the organization of memories, eyewitness memory, and false memories. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Grysman.

358F Educational Psychology.
The application of psychological theory and research to teaching and learning in educational settings. Draws on theories from a variety of disciplines including social, cognitive and developmental psychology. Topics will include learning, instruction, intelligence, creativity, motivation, communication, cultural influences, developmentally appropriate practice and assessment. Emphasis on empirical evidence from psychology and education. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Sage.

[360] Clinical Assessment.
In-depth study of assessment methodologies used in clinical psychology research and practice. Emphasis on design issues, data analysis issues, scale construction, interviewing, testing, self-report and observation. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201.

[361] The Social Psychological Study of the Self.
Theoretical and methodological understanding of the study of the self in social psychology. Topics include organization of self-concept and its effect on information processing, self-awareness, self-esteem maintenance processes, cultural influences, stigmas and self-regulation. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 311 or 337.

364F Personality Psychology.
Review of personality theories with an emphasis on contemporary approaches. Topics include life stress, social support and coping. Emphasis on research methodology and practical applications of the results. Students will design and conduct research projects that contribute to subfields discussed in class. Prerequisite, Psych/Neuro 201. Not open to students who have taken 214 or 338. Pierce.

380F Research Design.
Advanced study of psychological research methods, with a focus on critically evaluating original research, independently designing and executing studies, and writing scientific research reports. Topics include reliability and validity, experimental and non-experimental methods, and effective design of studies. Some coverage of advanced statistical techniques such as mediational analyses and multiple regression. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, Psych. 101, 201. Borton.

455F Field Study in Psychology.
Seminar in psychological services combined with eight to 10 hours per week of field study in one of several cooperating local agencies and schools. Extensive written project addressing theoretical issues relevant to field work. Topics include methods in provision of psychological, educational and applied services, and methodological and ethical issues in psychotherapy, counseling and educational psychology. Prerequisite, three courses in psychology and departmental permission. Open to juniors and seniors. Maximum enrollment, 8. Morris.

[498S] Behavioral Interventions in Applied Settings.
Seminar on the theory and practice of applied behavior analysis combined with eight to 10 hours per week of field work in a school setting. Topics include measurement and observation techniques, empirically validated school interventions and single-subject experimental designs. Field work will include meetings with school personnel, weekly observations of students, and implementation and evaluation of behavioral interventions. Written summaries of research and field work, oral presentations to classmates, and oral presentations to school personnel required. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Prior experience with behavioral interventions helpful. Maximum enrollment, 6.

500F-501SF,S Senior Project.
Supervised research on a specific problem in psychology or neuroscience based on proposals submitted to the department by the end of a student’s junior year. Open to senior concentrators. The Department.

New England Center for Children

392N Principles of Behavior Analysis.
Orients students to the concepts, processes and scientific principles of behavior on which the field of applied behavior analysis was founded. Topics of study will include the history and defining features of applied behavior analysis as well as the role of basic principles in producing socially meaningful behavior change (positive and negative reinforcement, punishment, discriminative control of behavior and motivating operations). Prerequisite, 280/201 if the course is to count toward the concentration or minor. Open only to participants in the Cooperative Educational Program at the New England Center for Children. The Department.

393N Behavioral Assessment for Children with Special Needs.
An introduction to key concepts, methods and ethical considerations associated with behavioral assessment. Objectives will include teaching students to distinguish between idiographic and norm-referenced assessment approaches, to conduct pertinent behavioral assessments (preference assessments, functional assessments and skills assessments), and to incorporate assessment outcomes with treatment selection and design in accordance with contemporary best practices in the field of applied behavior analysis. Prerequisite, 280/201 if the course is to count toward the concentration or minor. Open only to participants in the Cooperative Educational Program at the New England Center for Children. The Department.

394N Autism and Related Disabilities.
A foundation in etiological, diagnostic, ethical and treatment-related considerations affecting services for individuals with autism and other disabilities. Topics of study will include current data on causal variables, issues in early identification and a survey of evidence-based models of treatment, outcome evaluation, and effective systems support for individuals with pervasive developmental disabilities. Prerequisite, 280/201 if the course is to count toward the concentration or minor. Open only to participants in the Cooperative Educational Program at the New England Center for Children. The Department.

397N Methods of Evaluation.
Equips students with skills needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of interventions by subjecting them to experimental evaluation using single-subject designs. Students will learn to develop valid and reliable systems for measuring behavior, to display data using popular and accessible graphing software, and to assess for orderly changes in behavior through visual inspection and interpretation of graphic data. Prerequisite, 280/201 if the course is to count toward the concentration or minor. Open only to participants in the Cooperative Educational Program at the New England Center for Children. The Department.

398N Evidence-based Teaching.
Provides students with a comprehensive review of empirically supported behavioral teaching procedures for individuals with autism and related disabilities. Topics will focus on teaching skills in a variety of content areas such as language, social, and self-help. Procedures for teaching these include, match-to-sample discrimination training, task analysis, as well as prompting procedures including prompt fading and video modeling. Prerequisite, 280/201 if the course is to count toward the concentration or minor. Open only to participants in the Cooperative Educational Program at the New England Center for Children. The Department.

(from the Hamilton Course Catalogue)

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