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Anthropology

Research Opportunities

Every other summer, the department offers an archaeology field course. Students spend two months in the desert of Nevada implementing methods learned in the classroom. Excavation takes place at one of the earliest archaeological sites in North America, dating to more than 10,000 years ago. Students explore a variety of field methods and gain the experience living and interacting in a field camp.

Archaeology Course Research Reveals Tribal Territory Expanse

This summer, a group of nine students, including five Hamilton students Lindsay Buff, Anna Arnn, Petra Elfström, Mariah Walzer, and Grace Berg spent six weeks in the picturesque Slocan Valley, British Columbia, as participants in Hamilton’s archaeology field school led by Nathan Goodale, associate professor of anthropology, and Alissa Nauman.  More ...

Anna Arnn '17
Anna Arnn ’17 Takes to Archaeological Field Work

Anna Arnn ’17 is taking her studies in archaeology into the field this summer as part of a program through the University of Montana Missoula. Through the project Arnn will be working with UMM graduate student Matt Walsh, performing faunal analysis, or the study of animal remains in the context of archaeology.  More ...

Tanapat (Ice) Treyanurak '17, right, tutors immigrant Lucy Wang in ESL at BOCES Utica Access site.
Tanapat Treyanurak ’17 Continuing Work Related to Project SHINE Through Levitt Grant

While students, faculty, staff and visitors to Hamilton know that the Mohawk Valley is a beautiful and engaging place to live, another striking feature of the area is its position as a cultural and ethnic melting pot, thanks in large part to the City of Utica’s diverse refugee and immigrant populations. Tanapat Treyanurak ’17 is spending his summer continuing work related to Project SHINE, a program dedicated to assisting in the incorporation and assimilation of immigrants and refugees into local communities, through a Levitt Center grant.  More ...

Amber Torres '16
Amber Torres ’16 Works on “Selling the City” Through Emerson Project

Amber Torres ’16 is familiarizing herself with the basic economic and political logistics of urban planning this summer through a research project titled “Selling the City.” The project represents “an analysis of the complex relationship between real estate, consumerism and the middle/working class market” and will be undertaken through means of data collection, interviews and site observation.   More ...

Goodale Class Digs Into Hamilton's Past

Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nathan Goodale’s “Archaeology of Hamilton’s Founding” (Arch 110) class is excavating the property at 60 College Hill Road, looking for evidence that would link the structure back to its possible construction date of 1793 (per the plaque above the door). Investigations of several architectural features are indicative of the 18th century, making this possibly the oldest structure still on its original foundation on campus.   More ...

A Sinixt Pithouse in the Slocan Valley.
Piecing Together the Past: Artifacts from 2,700 Year Old Village

Although many people might not find archaeology as exciting as it’s portrayed in the Indiana Jones franchise, Morgan Biggs ’16 does. Biggs, an archaeology major, is working with Assistant Professor of Archaeology Nathan Goodale to analyze artifacts from the Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project (SNAP). Last summer, Biggs attended Hamilton’s field school, led by Goodale, and excavated artifacts from the Slocan Narrows Pithouse Village in southeastern British Columbia, Canada.  More ...

Nine Students Awarded Class of '79 Travel Grant

Nine Hamilton seniors have been selected to receive the Class of 1979 Student Travel Award. The award, established by the alumni of Hamilton's Class of 1979, offers financial assistance to Hamilton students who wish to pursue extensive research projects in different parts of the world.  More ...

Maggie Haag '15, left, teaches English to refugees at Conkling School in Utica.
Hamilton Student Teaches Literacy Via Technology

Utica has the fourth highest concentration of refugees of all cities in the United States. Many of these immigrants struggle to adjust to American culture and language. Through a Kirkland Summer Associate project, Maggie Haag ’15 is trying new ways to use technology to teach refugees English and help them to understand American culture.  More ...

Cupola